The Thief of Joy

The Thief of Joy

She got a new promotion. She just got engaged. She bought a new car. All the while you are hanging on by a thread to your job. Or maybe you have thought---“Hey, I have just as much talent as so-and-so. Why not me?”. Has comparison ever tried to steal your joy?

Taming the Tech Industry

Taming the Tech Industry

It’s an age-old story that doesn’t seem to be changing fast enough: women are struggling to get a foothold in the tech industry. This is especially true for women of color who have had to contend with both gender and racial bias. Yet, the good news is that change is happening, and today many women of color are succeeding in forging top careers in the tech industry. Here are four women of color who are making a name for themselves in the male-dominated tech industry-- they are undoubtedly opening a door for more women to succeed in the future.

A Dry Season

A Dry Season

Have you ever had a “dry” season in life? When you felt like things just haven’t been right on the job or at home? Those moments when you do everything by the book, and yet life still seems to serve you a bowl full of uncertainty with a side of anxiety?

Donate, Delegate, and Get Organized!

Donate, Delegate, and Get Organized!

A few years ago, we spoke to professional organizer, Miranda Mims, about how to get more organized at work and at home. She reminded us that the better we are at getting and staying organized, the more time and attention we can give to the things that really matter to us -- like our purpose, our family, and our friends. "Life is to be enjoyed," she said.

ICYMI: Women of Resilience Awards 2019

Women of Resilience Awards, 2019; from left, Minda Harts (CEO, The Memo), Yari Blanco (honoree), Eboni K. Williams (honoree), Rachana Bhide (honoree)

Women of Resilience Awards, 2019; from left, Minda Harts (CEO, The Memo), Yari Blanco (honoree), Eboni K. Williams (honoree), Rachana Bhide (honoree)

On Thursday, we hosted our 3rd Annual Women of Resilience Awards event. Every year, we honor women who are doing amazing things in business and in their communities, and we are awed by the amazing stories of the women in the room. This year was no different. In case you weren’t able to make it, we’ve got you covered!

We were inspired by our honorees and by all of the women (and a few men) who shared their Thursday evening with us at SeatGeek in New York City.

This year we honored: Yari Blanco, Founder of The Girl Mob, and Senior Manager of Culture & Diversity at The Wing; Rachana Bhide, Broadcaster, and Founder of The Corner of the Court, a program that highlights the importance of gender partnerships and male allies in women’s careers; and Eboni K. Williams, TV host, attorney, and author of the best selling book, Pretty Powerful.


Dropping Gems:

Yari Blanco -- Founder, The Girl Mob:

  • Make sure mentorship is mutually beneficial.
  • Show up, be brave, and use your voice.
  • “I’m doing this not [only] for myself...I’m doing this for so many other people.”

Rachana Bhide -- Founder, Corner of the Court + Broadcaster:

  • Family, community and support systems are crucial -- that includes male allies.
  • Being a woman of color is about rewriting the script.
  • "My most resilient moment was a physical manifestation of literally being uncomfortable in my own skin, and finding resilience through that.”

Eboni K. Williams -- TV Host, Author, & Attorney

  • “I’m still betting on myself.”
  • The interview starts before you open your mouth.
  • Don’t let the glitz and glamour cause you to forget…“it is the blood of survivors that allows me the resilience to do what I do.”

Social Media:

For a full recap of the night, check out our WOR2019 Instagram story, curated by the amazing @_inspiredbykrys


Thank You:

Thanks to our speakers: Master of Ceremonies, Brittney Oliver, Founder of Lemons 2 Lemonade, and our Fireside Chat Speakers, Krystal Scott, CEO, The Well, and Dorianne St. Fleur, Founder, Your Career Girl

Thank you to all of our event sponsors, gift bag sponsors, and vendors: SeatGeek, Sweetgreen, Grammarly, Broadly.com, Vivid Lash Bar, and Gourmet Garage.

Thanks to our amazing DJ for the night, DjQLynn

Finally, thank you to everyone who attended!


If you know a woman who should be honored in 2020, let us know!

Be Someone’s Best Advocate

Photo: WOCinTechChat

Photo: WOCinTechChat

By: The Memo Staff

We often discuss what it’s like to advocate for ourselves, but what would it look like if we advocated for others? What would it look like if we stood in the gap for others when they aren’t able to stand in the gap for themselves? The happiness that we feel when we stand up for ourselves during those times that require us to -- think how good it might make another colleague feel when that is done for them unsolicited. If we want folks to advocate for us, sometimes we have to signal to others that we would advocate for them, too.

Here are four ways you can be an advocate for someone else:

  • Listen & Learn: Actively listen to what your colleagues are telling you about their experiences at work. Take the time to learn about another marginalized group. Don't count on others to do all the work teaching you how to advocate for them. Find books, articles, films, etc. Learn what it's like to be in someone else's shoes. The more you understand about what your colleagues are going through, the better you can be at advocating for them when appropriate.
  • Raise Your Hand On Their Behalf: Speaking of listening and learning...some of our greatest opportunities come from other people speaking our names when we aren’t in the room. Listen when your colleagues share what they want out of certain roles and their careers. That way, when you see an opportunity arise that would be great for them, you can speak up. Maybe you heard about a new committee opening up, and you remember that one of your colleagues mentioned being interested in getting more involved in the company in that way -- if you are in a position of power in the company, or you happen to know someone on the selection committee -- consider mentioning them for the role. Even if you aren’t a decision maker, consider mentioning the opportunity to your colleague. Maybe they hadn’t heard about it, and you can be their eyes and ears.
  • Recognize Others’ Authenticity: Just as we’ve discussed self-advocacy, there are certain identity points that resonate with us that allow us to bring those authentic parts of ourselves to the workplace. How does your colleague identify? If no one else in the office acknowledges their authenticity, and you know it would mean the world to them if someone in the office “sees” them---be the one to help foster that visibility. For example, if one of your colleagues identifies with the pronouns “they” or “them,” help facilitate inclusion by addressing them in the way they have requested. As Lauryn Hill told us, “Respect is just a minimum.
  • Step Up: Have you ever been in a situation when someone at work said an off-color joke and no one said anything? Perhaps that joke was said, and you were the only woman or person of color, and it left you feeling awkward while everyone else pretended like it was not a big deal? How powerful would it have been if one of your colleagues vocalized that the joke was inappropriate and we don’t use that type of language? Or they approached you to see if you were okay, and apologized for not stepping up at that moment. These types of activities go on daily. Be the person that steps up when your colleague is feeling isolated and alone. Don’t be the person that normalizes bad workplace behavior.

A huge part of building a strong network is relationship building, and I don’t know any better way to start building stronger relationships with your colleagues than advocating and speaking up on their behalf. Again the great Lauryn Hill said, “Tell me, who I have to be to get some reciprocity.” Even though she was talking about an ex, I think if we flex our ability to advocate for others, hopefully, they will reciprocate when given the opportunity. You might be surprised by who steps up for you next time.

Celebrate Good Times

Celebrate Good Times

Three years ago, we were thinking of ways to highlight more women of color in business that might not be celebrated in the ways that some of our counterparts are celebrated. And, that idea manifested in the creation of The Women of Resilience Awards--three years ago. And each year it has been a privilege to celebrate our accomplishments together.

Vulnerability Matters

Vulnerability Matters

I am trying to do a better job of having more of a balance in the media and messages I consume (I mean, one must learn to find balance outside of catching up on Game of Thrones). I found this new five-day devotional by Tauren Wells, called “Known”.

He said two things that resonated with me:

  • We often create superficial selves and relegate every relationship to the shallow end of the relational experience. 

  • The foundation of intimacy is vulnerability.

These two statements might not mean too much to you, but vulnerability has been something I have been struggling with over the last year. 

The Big Comeback

The Big Comeback

Have you ever needed to have a difficult conversation at work? You know the one where your coworker might have touched your hair without permission, and --being that it's 2019-- you were left standing in shock not knowing how to address it? Or a colleague or manager has said something disparaging about you or your work that you know isn't accurate? Lastly, maybe you remember a time where you had an idea in a meeting and one of your colleagues continued to talk over you. You left that meeting thinking to yourself, "I should have said something."

Carpe That Diem

Carpe That Diem

As we wrap up the first quarter of the year, I am reminded of the resolutions many of us made for ourselves. Weight loss, changing your job, quitting smoking, getting rid of/staying away from that no good ex once and for all, or putting down that alcohol. How have you done on staying committed to your goals and resolutions?

Getting Unstuck

Getting Unstuck

These past few months, I've stared at a lot of blank screens. I’ve had a few big projects come up, and didn’t know where or how to begin. So I stared at the screen. I stared for long stretches of time, trying to will myself in a direction that seemed to not come.

"Pay Me What You Owe Me"

"Pay Me What You Owe Me"

April 2nd is Equal Pay Day for Women. We know that all women do not make the same for some of the same jobs--but if we keep negotiating and asking, our hope is to get closer to dismantling the wage gap. Recently, Payscale.com released a report and the discrepancy in pay as it pertains to women of color was simultaneously heartbreaking yet not not surprising. Check out their comprehensive report here.

We Are All Leaders

We Are All Leaders

Some of you might not know that I teach a course on Leading Talent Development at NYU Wagner. One of the reasons I decided to add "Professor" next to my name is because I wanted to help influence the next generation of leaders and managers in relation to how they see human capital in the workplace. More importantly, I wanted to reinforce how they should invest in human capital that might not look or identity like they do.

Take a Break

Take a Break

Part of self-care is being kind to yourself. If we are running this marathon called life at a sprinter's pace, we won't be able to give the best parts of ourselves to our family, friends, projects, or ourselves. Running too fast will ultimately result in burn out. We have too much work to do on this earth to be worn down and tired, just because we didn't heed to our body's warning signs to slow down.

Tips for Managing Up

Tips for Managing Up

My mother first taught me about managing up. That isn’t what she called it, of course, but when I got my first job, she’d tell me stories about her career. She'd share how she went from working in the basement at her company to getting promoted to a number of different roles, and the little things she did to get there. She'd regularly give me suggestions on how to be great at work, and how to get the most done with (or in spite of) whatever boss I had.

Our Super Power

Our Super Power

As we move out of Black History month and into Women’s History Month, it’s hard for me to not think about all the amazing women that helped to raise me. From my mother to my grandmother and aunts--they have each poured into me in a variety of ways that remind me of how fearless and wonderfully made I am: in all my blackness and my womanhood.

I not only celebrate them, but I also celebrate you.

Unsung Heroes

Unsung Heroes

Today, as we head into the last official week of Black History Month, we want to continue to shout out trailblazers. Every year, we hear about the usual names: Rosa, Malcolm, Martin, Sojourner. While they have certainly earned their right to grace the pages of our textbooks and our social consciousness, there were so many others blazing a trail in history.

Here are four black women trailblazers that you may or may not have heard about.

Securing Our Seat

HARTS_The Memo_orange.jpg

by: Minda Harts, Founder, The Memo

If you have followed some of the commentary on social media around Black History Month, you may have seen many folks calling for a do-over (with all the atrocities taking place from Gucci to Virginia and beyond). And even though a lot of jaw-dropping moments have taken place, it doesn’t take away from all the amazing accomplishments of women of color so far this year--like Kamala Harris running for President or Rosalind Brewer joining the board of Amazon. And maybe you have hit a goal or received a raise this month, those accomplishments are just as notable!

One accomplishment that I want to share with our community is that my upcoming book The Memo: What Women of Color Need to Know to Secure a Seat at the Table by Hachette Book Group is available for pre-order. The Memo is the much-needed career advice guide for women of color specifically, ending the one-size-fits-all approach of business books that lump together women across races and overlook the unique barriers to success for women of color. I have written a lot about issues that women of color face in the workplace and I am excited to expand the conversation beyond just our Monday Memos.

Many of our ancestors were not permitted to learn to read and write, and I feel so blessed to have the opportunity to write a book that sheds much-needed light on how women of color and black women experience the workplace. My book debuts on August 20th and I hope you would consider purchasing one for yourself, your friends, and your team. This book provides a roadmap to help women of color and their allies make a real change to the system.

Let’s continue to make history all year long!